Conversely, lump-sum agreements work well for consistent and predictable legal work. The establishment of wills, uncontested divorces or mortgage executions could be examples[2]. However, there is never a guarantee that a case will be simple, so law firms should have a thorough admission process to detect warning signs that might require a different pricing structure for a case. With the adoption of the new rules of professional conduct in November 2018, California joined the vast majority of jurisdictions that require lawyers to pay all client funds, including advanced attorney fees, into a Client Trust Account (CTA). The old rule 4-100 only required deposits for fees that had to be filed in an AOC. The best practice was to pay a preliminary fee into a CTA, as these “funds are partly owned by a client and partly owned by a client or potentially to the member or law firm” and could be properly paid into a CTA in accordance with the previous rule 4-100 (A) (2). For example, a lawyer who has brought a criminal case to a preliminary hearing that ends the day before can probably show that the lawyer fully earned the lump sum fee based on the hours worked and how far the lawyer advanced the client`s case. . . .