Improving the transparency framework of the Paris Agreement imposes new and stricter requirements on developing countries. For many countries, capacity-building assistance is essential for the implementation of these new requirements. This new Climate Transparency Project document looks in particular at how the new requirements have been improved, highlights countries` experience with transparency, and highlights initiatives and processes to support capacity building. Capacity building is more than just climate change, as it has its own SDG 17.9 goal in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: “Improve international support for the implementation of effective and targeted capacity building in developing countries, in order to support national plans to achieve all the Sustainable Development Goals, notably through North-South, South-South and Triangular cooperation. The provisions of the Paris Agreement on capacity building can be seen as fundamental to all other institutions, mechanisms and processes. This document draws on a historical perspective of capacity-building efforts, including within the framework of the UNFCCC, to formulate specific proposals for the Paris Committee for Capacity Building and the Capacity Building Initiative on Transparency, as well as a broader perspective on the main elements of sustainable capacity building. Capacity building is intended to strengthen countries` ambitions, to exploit their potential with regard to the specific components of adaptation and reduction. Capacity-building is part of many activities and sectors and encompasses a large number of actors. Better coordination and coordination between constituted bodies, climate funds and other processes is needed to promote climate protection and strengthen ambitions. Based on this effort, more than 65 partners have been mobilized to organize the second Capacity Building Hub at COP 25, which will host around 55 events. were created around a coherent narrative dedicated to highlighting capacity building as a cross-cutting theme, integrated into all hub themes, including transparency, local governments and cities, ways to implement, translate knowledge into action, increase ambition, loss and harm. With regard to the fight against climate change and the Paris Agreement on climate change, capacity building received a significant boost in 2015, when the Conference of the Parties (COP) highlighted the Paris Capacity Building Committee (BCCP) to address existing and emerging gaps and needs in the implementation of capacity building in developing countries.

and to further intensify efforts to strengthen capacity-building. The BCCP is composed of 12 representatives from developed and developing countries who meet annually and report regularly on their progress and activities to the COP. It is the mission of the Coalition on Paris Agreement Capacity Building to accelerate the debate on an inclusive and smart global capacity building strategy. . . .